Pasture Grown Pork

Our hogs are raised outdoors and fed corn, skim milk, kitchen and garden scraps. Hogs are intelligent, sociable animals if allowed to "act like a pig". They are an important part of a sustainable farm in that they clean up all the scraps. We do not use artificial nitrites or nitrates or MSG in any of our cures. If you've never eaten pastured pork, you're in for a real treat!

Pastured Pork
Ground Pork.....................$7.00 lb.
Pork Patties (1# package)..$8.00 lb.
Seasoned Sausage..........$8.00 lb.
(Mild Italian or Sugar Free Sage or Chorizo)
*Sugar-free Sage-

Cased sausage.................$9.00 lb
*Pork Chops.....................$12.00 lb.
*Bnls.Butterfly Chops.......$13.00 lb.
*Shoulder Roast...............$7.00 lb.

*Spare Ribs......................$4.00 lb.
 

New! Homestead Packages - ready to be purchased at one of our pick-up locations in Kokomo, Noblesville or Indianapolis

Pork is also available by the ½ or whole.

Cost savings is approximately 10%.

 

Download our pork bulk ordering form


**Bacon ..........................$11.00 lb.
**Bacon Ends..................$8.50 lb.
**Jowl Bacon...................$8.50 lb.
**Ham Steak....................$8.50 lb.
**Ham Roast....................$7.50 lb.
*Baby Back Ribs..............$6.25 lb.
*Ham Hocks.....................$4.50 lb.
*Lard (1.6# container)......$6.00 qt

*Pork Fat..........................$1.00 lb
 

*Random weights, ** No artificial nitrates used in curing.          All prices subject to change.    Last update: 5/26/2018

Misunderstood Hogs

Hogs have been given a rather bum rap, in as much as they're considered fat, dirty and lazy creatures; and, all that fat isn't good for you.

 

Myths, myths. All of it.

 

Consider this:

 

  • Pigs do not sweat, plus they don't have a thick hair coat to protect their skin from the elements of nature; therefore, God gifted them with the instinct to wallow in cool mud to cool down and as a natural sunblock.

 

  • Pigs are a scavenger animal; they are willing to eat almost anything. Now before you think "yuck!", consider that on any diversified farm, there are many waste scraps such as left-over milk, skim milk, (a by product of heavy cream), and vegetables not "good enough" for people, and kitchen scraps. Pigs not only eat it but grow fat and sassy on it. Talk about a win-win. Pigs love it, and the farmer turns a loss into a gain.

As for "dirty as a pig", I suppose that term comes from the afore mentioned mud. But given a choice, pigs are very sanitary animals. They have self-designated sleeping, eating and messing areas. Very rarely will hogs mess in their bed. Usually only in confinement when they have no choice.

 

As for lazy, hogs will forage on grasses, weeds, acorns, and other nuts if given the chance. They will work to fill their needs and the needs of their young before they're content to lay in the shade and grunt the day away. They are fat, yes, but not out of shape. They are heavy but strong and agile.

 

While we're on the subject of fat,  let's talk about lard. I firmly believe that lard, as well as butter, have been given a poor representation by the "whoever it is that decides what we should eat." Lard from pastured pigs is soft, melty, stuff. Quite unlike the hardened, hydrogenated, gunk that we've replaced it with. I use it to make soap that my skin loves.  I use it in whole wheat bread, for soft satiny bread. I use it to make wonderful pie crusts. I even fry doughnuts in it, occasionally. Oh yes, I fry chicken and potatoes in it. I was one of those people that never fried food....Butter burns too quickly, don't like coconut oil flavor in potatoes, Crisco is not an option, so what do I do? Then we started raising pigs and I discovered lard. I love it! Try it for yourself! Side note on nutrition: I'm using lard in faith that God the creator designed it for my good, but if you want to, proof check with the Weston A Price Foundation for the scientific facts. Note that I have found a distinct difference between the lard from pastured pigs and lard from confinement pigs. Fresher smell, no "piggy" taste, softer, creamier texture. That texture spells more omega 3 fatty acids, which is softening versus omega 6 which is hardening. I believe there's a better balance in pastured pork's lard.

 

Another question that arises when pork and nutrition are discussed, is the nitrate cure problem. The latest science says the nitrate free celery juice powder cure, creates natural nitrates. However, I find that when eating pork cured with it, I don't get the insatiable thirst and headaches that go with conventionally cured pork. I would recommend that you try it for yourself, and let your body be the judge. 

 

 

© HOMESTEAD HERITAGE FARM IS A LOCAL FAMILY FARM SERVING CENTRAL INDIANA WITH PICKUP LOCATIONS IN THE KOKOMO, NOBLESVILLE, AND INDIANAPOLIS AREAS.

 

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